For years the image of who drives change in our democracy has reflected an old narrative of straight white men in smoky rooms. 

The Beat DC blows through that trope. 

We’re the only daily political news platform that highlights the people of color driving policy in the nation’s capital and beyond, and the policies that impact communities of color at large. 

House Republicans Lose Only Black Woman, Keeps Only Black Man

House Republicans Lose Only Black Woman, Keeps Only Black Man

Congresswoman Mia Love (R-UT), the only Black woman in Congress, appears to be losing her re-election bid to Salt Lake City Mayor Ben McAdams. Though the race has not officially been called, absentee ballots have widened the lead for McAdams -- he is now ahead 51.5% to 48.5%, a lead of 3 points and 5,414 votes. Love’s re-election campaign distanced itself from the Trump administration, and the president attributed that to her poor performance in Utah’s 4th Congressional District. “Mia Love gave me no love and she lost,” Trump said. “Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.” Love voted with Trump 95.7% of the time. Meanwhile, Congressman Will Hurd (R-TX) was able to narrowly hold on to his seat fending off a challenge from Gina Ortiz Jones in the Lone Star State’s 23rd Congressional District. Ortiz Jones has yet to concede the race, with good reason. The narrow margin of victory in the state’s only true swing congressional district sets up the potential of a recount in one of the most contested races in Congress, which could take until the end of November to decide. Just a few hours after the state’s final unofficial returns declared him the winner by 689 votes. Ortiz Jones has until the end of the business day on the second day after counties in the district and the state have completed their reviews of provisional and late mail-in ballots to file her request for a recount. Meanwhile, the 41-year-old Congressman and former CIA agent is being called the first person in two decades to win three consecutive terms in a seat that is nearly evenly split between Democrat and Republican voters. “I’m proud to have won another tough re-election,” Hurd said in a statement. “This was a historic election with almost 210,000 people voting and a statewide Democratic candidate getting over 48 percent of the vote for the first time in decades.” More here.

Attorneys General Races Called in Connecticut and Nevada

Attorneys General Races Called in Connecticut and Nevada

More Historic House Wins

More Historic House Wins