For years the image of who drives change in our democracy has reflected an old narrative of straight white men in smoky rooms. 

The Beat DC blows through that trope. 

We’re the only daily political news platform that highlights the people of color driving policy in the nation’s capital and beyond, and the policies that impact communities of color at large. 

FCC’s Ajit Pai Aims to Free Up Space on the Airwaves 

FCC’s Ajit Pai Aims to Free Up Space on the Airwaves 

The FCC is considering freeing up more radio airwaves for use in 5G networks in its next monthly meeting, Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement. 5G is the fifth generation of cellular mobile communications. The technology is expected to drive the next big wave of spending for global wireless carriers, who are looking to mitigate the effects of a saturating wireless market by getting customers to spend more on their wireless data services. There’s been a lot of competition among carriers to be the world’s first 5G commercial network. The FCC’s proposed changes are a part of the federal government’s broader plan to foster more shared uses of the nation’s increasingly crowded airwaves. The move will open up airwaves now used by a range of industries including communications companies, utilities, and broadcasters for unlicensed uses such as Wi-Fi, to help alleviate the growing wireless traffic crunch. Pai said the agency would also look at removing regulations on rural carriers, which he said would let them invest in their networks. He said the order, if approved, would enable rural companies to take “resources currently wasted on regulatory compliance and devote them to building stronger networks and delivering better services.” Improving coverage across the country, whether through 5G or better Wi-Fi, has been a priority for the agency and one of the few issues on which many people can agree. More here.

Execs at Google Shuffle As Ad Chief Leaves

Execs at Google Shuffle As Ad Chief Leaves

IndieWire Hires Reporter to Boost Black Film Coverage 

IndieWire Hires Reporter to Boost Black Film Coverage